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>> Breadcrumb :/Tag:electrical noise

What is electrical noise and how does it affect your DAC?

By | March 25th, 2019|Categories: DAR|Tags: , , , |

We’ve been here eleventy billion times before: the sound quality of a digital audio system doesn’t rely simply on the safe arrival of each and every bit but how accurately those bits are timed into the DAC chip. Any mis-timing is called jitter. Electrical noise – entering hi-fi components via the mains and via cables acting as antennae – can seriously disturb the timing accuracy of a DAC’s clock oscillators.

Not only. According to Garth Powell, Direct of Power/Engineering at AudioQuest, electrical noise will also make its way into the analogue section of a DAC to potentially mask the very low-level signal retrieval for which it was designed/purchased.… Read the full article

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Why isn’t digital audio “just ones and zeroes”?

By | November 24th, 2018|Categories: DAR|Tags: , , , , , , |

Connections. Between streamer and DAC we have choices: The ubiquity of consumer-grade PCs and SBCs has seen USB rise to the top of the popularity pile but network streamer manufacturers often add various combinations of the three S/PDIF outputs to broaden their device’s deployment possibilities: coaxial, AES/EBU or TOSLINK. (i2S makes only occasional appearances).

Over-simplistic thinking – and thinkers – tell us that all digital connections between streamer and DAC sound identical. That the bits comprising the digital audio signal are exactly that – bits – and that as long as they all arrive intact, a high-end audio streamer’s USB output, like that found on the Innuos Zenith MKII SE, will sound identical to that of a Raspberry Pi.… Read the full article

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