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>> Breadcrumb :/Tag:Jazzed Up

The Real Billie Holiday, Part One – 1930s

By | March 19th, 2019|Categories: Dagogo|Tags: , , |

 

 

This profile of Billie Holiday is presented in three chapters covering the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s respectively.  She’s quoted from interviews and her famed memoir, Lady Sings the Blues.  Representative recordings, podcast clips and readings add detail and perspective to each decade of her compelling story.  It is notable that photographs of Billie’s mercurial visage are constantly shifting, never the same twice.

2A) Fur and cocktail

Singing Style

It’s not an exaggeration to call Billie Holiday (Eleanora Fagan, 1915-59) the best of all jazz singers. 

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Frank “Big Boy” Goudie: Jazz on Three Continents Part 3 of 3, San Francisco 1956-64

By | February 15th, 2019|Categories: Dagogo|Tags: , |

 

“Behind his easy smile lies one the most colorful stories in jazz.” Richard Hadlock, San Francisco Examiner, July 1963. Goudie photograph by, and copyright of William Carter, 1962.

Frank “Big Boy” Goudie (b. 1899 Louisiana – d. 1964 California) has been almost completely overlooked by jazz history, a mere footnote until recently.  A skilled musician, his career paralleled the history of jazz itself: origins in Louisiana, migration to Europe, transition to Swing, integration with Latin music and the New Orleans revival.

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Frank “Big Boy” Goudie: Jazz On Three Continents Part 2 of 3, South America 1939-46 and Europe 1946-56

By | January 2nd, 2019|Categories: Dagogo|Tags: , |


Also read: Frank “Big Boy” Goudie: Jazz On Three Continents  Part 1 of 3, France and Europe 1924-1939

Goudie at Chikito Club. Bern, Switzerland, 1949. Jazzindex.

Frank “Big Boy” Goudie (b. 1899 Louisiana – d. 1964 California) has been almost completely overlooked by jazz history, a mere footnote in the jazz chronicles until recently.  A skilled musician, he played saxophone, trumpet and clarinet.  He performed jazz, swing, dance, Latin and ethnic music on three continents.

This article traces his intriguing years in South America, centered in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  

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Frank “Big Boy” Goudie: Jazz On Three Continents Part 1 of 3, France and Europe 1924-1939

By | November 7th, 2018|Categories: Dagogo|Tags: , |

Goudie’s professional headshot, 1939. Photo courtesy and property of Christine Goudie.

Frank “Big Boy” Goudie (b. 1899 Louisiana – d. 1964 California) has been almost completely overlooked; a mere footnote in the jazz chronicles until recently.  He was a skilled musician who played saxophone, trumpet and clarinet, performing jazz, swing, dance, Latin and ethnic music on three continents.  His career paralleled the history of jazz itself: origins in Louisiana, migration to Europe, transition to Swing, integration with Latin music and the New Orleans revival.

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Barbara Lashley, A Love Affair with Song

By | September 10th, 2018|Categories: Dagogo|Tags: , |

Jazzed-Up

Lashley Belle Portrait “It was always hard to believe, for most of us who worked with Barbara, that any jazz singer could be that sweet and that uncomplicated. She didn’t have a cynical or a snide molecule in her.” — Richard Hadlock, Annals of Jazz, KCSM-FM, 1992

Singer Barbara Lashley (1935-1992) was a bright light in San Francisco Bay Area jazz during the 1980s.  This article offers an introduction via her best but long out-of-print 1983 record album and three newly recovered live performances. 

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Bob Mielke’s Oakland A’s Strolling Dixieland Band, 1969-92

By | June 21st, 2018|Categories: Dagogo|Tags: , |

Jazzed-Up

“We’ve had a really warm response. It’s fun to be able to play to the people directly. Face to face, not through a microphone or anything. It’s just a really rewarding experience.” – Bob Mielke, Interview on Radio KNBR, Nov 1969

Here’s a slice of rollicking Americana from a time and place not so far away.  Or was it?

For nearly a quarter century Oakland A’s Swingers Baseball Band brought vintage jazz to ballpark audiences, Traditional Jazz events and private parties.

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Burp Hollow

By | April 25th, 2018|Categories: Dagogo|Tags: , |

The Infamous Burp Hollow, San Francisco Nightclub, 1956-66

Musicians and denizens of Burp Hollow in their natural habitat. L to R: Bob Mielke (trombone), Ted Butterman (cornet), Bill Erickson (piano), Pete Allen (bass), Dick Oxtot (banjo) and Bill Napier (clarinet). Courtesy of Ted Butterman. 

A seamy hole in the wall on Broadway — the booming entertainment strip of North Beach — this joint was near the bottom of the long list of jazz rooms flourishing in San Francisco around 1960.”

— Clarinet player Bill Carter, 2014

A Colorful Nightclub and Low Dive 

Hearing the name Burp Hollow today musicians cringe, remembering the bad pay and tiny stage, watered-down booze and unsavory owner, a wheel chair-bound former Mafioso.

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Remembering Buck Clayton (2018)

By | March 21st, 2018|Categories: Dagogo|Tags: , |

Swing Era Trumpeter Buck Clayton

“The prettiest cat I ever saw” — Billie Holiday.

Swing era trumpet player Buck Clayton (1911-1991) is best known for his role in the early success of Count Basie and his Orchestra and his sensitive accompaniment for Billie Holiday’s records. Clayton was the son of a tuba-playing minister, and yet because he had some Native-American blood his mother called him “Buck.” Contemporaries recalled his notable good looks, grand sartorial style, and striking blue-green eyes that won him the nickname “Cat Eyes.”

Compared to other trumpet stars of the 1930s, Buck’s sound was more streamlined, smoother and intimate.

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